Gatsby-Inspired Cocktails in New York City

The Plaza HotelFor me, there’s no cocktail era more romantic than the Roaring Twenties. Since reading F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby as a teenager, I have been hopelessly hooked on jazz music, cocktails, and New York City. That trifecta of passions has only deepened over the years. This year, my cocktail glass literally runneth over. Read More

It’s Time for March (Classic Martini) Madness

Photo Credit: Poul Lange

Slate.com has no shortage of excellent content, but their interactive Martini Madness contest is the most brilliant thing I’ve seen on the site yet. Their contributors researched most everything that’s been written on the world’s most iconic cocktail, distilling it into 80 drinks, with recipes and the occasional anecdote. Rules of the game? The drink must contain gin and vermouth. Everything else is up for grabs. Which recipes make it into the final NCAA-inspired brackets? You decide.

Read More

Tasting Notes: Atsby Armadillo Cake

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAIf I handed you an aperitif that started out with cardamom, cinnamon, and caramel notes, followed by a slightly astringent spice tea-like quality in the mid-palate, with a long, citrusy finish, would you think it was vermouth? Probably not. I’ve been testing Atsby Armadillo Cake out on friends, and not one has guessed that it was a vermouth. Which might be a good thing.

Read More

What is a pousse-cafe?

pousse_cafe

From Jerry Thomas’ 1862 book, How to Mix Drinks

Popularized in the mid-1800s, a poussé cafe is a multicolored, layered drink taken as a coffee chaser. In French, poussé literally means “to push,” as in, to push down the coffee. The differing specific gravities of each liqueur keeps the layers separate, though you have to be careful to pour slowly over the back of a spoon to achieve the Missoni-like layered look. At some point, these concoctions must have been popular.

Read More

Cocktail of the Moment: The Last Word

A sublimely addictive lime-cherry elixir (Photo credit: Poul Lange)

A sublimely addictive lime-cherry elixir (Photo credit: Poul Lange)

The cocktail that most surprised me while researching Storied Sips was an awful-sounding concoction that involved equal parts of four ingredients. I liked the symmetry of the recipe, but was sure this recipe was headed for disaster. After a promising start of gin and lime juice was listed two typically overpowering ingredients—the herbal, bitter liqueur Chartreuse, and maraschino, a vivid cherry liqueur. The formula sounded like a muddled mess.

Read More